Nightcrawler Goes Solo

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Issue #4; Cover Artist: Greg Land; Source: Marvel.com

Kurt Wagner, also known as Nightcrawler, has been one of the most iconic members of the X-Men since their rebranding as the Uncanny X-Men back in 1975. He has long been a fan favorite (and personal favorite of mine) because of his optimism and wit. He also blends his demonic outward appearance with the serene inner persona whose morality and generosity in unmatched among the X-Men. He has long been a crucial member of various teams of benevolent mutants, and his dynamics with other leading cast members of X-teams, such as Storm, Wolverine, Kitty Pryde, Colossus, and Cyclops have all been well-established for a long time.

Despite his popularity and the depth of his character, Nightcrawler did not get a chance at his own solo title until 2004, when Roberto Aguirre-Sacasa and Darick Robertson partnered up to do a 12-issue run. From the outset, the ambitious effort seemed difficult. What was there to truly differentiate him from the rest of his team? The missions he was sent on were mysteries of ghouls, ghosts, demons, and possession, leading him to Limbo and encounters with other odd demonic forces. I know he looks like a blue devil, but I never really like the weird demon plot-lines in the X-Men. The creative team did try to tie these events back to Kurt’s past, where his odd relationship with his step-sister/lover, Amanda Sefton began. Amanda had become the new Magik in Limbo by the time of this comic in 2004, making hers and Kurt’s relationship even weirder. Kurt had never really shown an aptitude for detective work, so Storm’s choice to send him on a solo mission to a hospital in the first issue seemed odd. The following series struggled to develop Nightcrawler independently of the X-Men, as Storm, Kitty, and Wolverine all made prominent appearances in almost every issue. The unfortunate result was a series of mystical-ish arcs that seemed like other X-Men team titles, only Nightcrawler did focus slightly more on Kurt’s past. The revisiting of  Kurt’s circus past was interesting, but just never wowed me. Aguirre-Sacasa’s writing seemed fine, but I never really got into the story. Same thing goes for Robertson’s art. The real highlight of the series for me was Greg Land’s cover art, and especially Issue #4 (above). Overall, I would say that this is a perfectly adequate comic for those who like these sort of stories, but it’s probably not for everyone. Rating: 5 of 10.

 

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